Florists Report, 1924-1926

12 12 2011

The following report of the Florist Department at the Oregon State Hospital was taken from the 22nd Biennial Report of the Oregon State Hospital for the biennium ending September 30, 1926.

The work of this department has been taken control of by one employe and six patients.  They are planting and caring for many beds of flowers on the hospital grounds, this department has furnished cut flowers and potted plants for use on the various wards.

Flowers, shrubs, plants and bulbs have been furnished without charge to the following institutions and departments:

 

Chemawa Indian School……………………………….160
Deaconess Hospital……………………………………..1382
Eastern Oregon State Hospital……………………….2633
Oregon State Industrial School for Girls…………..951
Oregon State Institution for the Feeble Minded…587
Oregon State Penitentiary……………………………..3267
Oregon State School for Blind…………………………418
Oregon State School for Deaf………………………….200
Oregon State Tuberculosis Hospital…………………143
Public schools and colleges in the state……………1126

Total………………………………………………………….10867





Finding Family- Online list of unclaimed remains now available

31 01 2011

Last week,  the Oregon State Hospital published an online database of the names of approximately 3,500 people whose cremated remains are in its custody.  It is hoped that the database will help family members claim the remains of their love ones.

Because the Oregon State Hospital had crematorium facilities, many unclaimed remains from other state institutions were sent there.  The newly published list includes people who lived at the Oregon State Tuberculosis Hospital, Mid-Columbia Hospital (The Dalles), Dammasch State Hospital (Wilsonville), Oregon State Penitentiary, and Fairview Training Center and Home, as well as the Oregon State Hospital, between 1914 and the 1970s.  All of these remains are stored at the hospital because they were unclaimed by family members at the time of the individual’s death.

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How to get to Portland, 1877

28 07 2010

For many years before the opening of the Oregon State Insane Asylum in Salem in 1883, Oregon contracted with a private hospital (the Oregon Hospital for the Insane) in Portland.  Patients from all over the state were sent to Portland. A 1879  disagreement about who was to pay for their transportation, gives an interesting look into what it took to get to Portland in the late 19th century.  The following is an invoice to the State of Oregon from B.F. Burch, the Superintendent of the State Penitentiary in Salem for the transport of a person to the hospital.  It was published in the 1879 “Report Of Committee of Investigation Appointed Pursuant to House Joint Resolutions, Nos. 8 and 13, Passed at the Tenth Regular Session of the Legislative Assembly of the State of Oregon.”¹

State of Oregon,
 To B. F. Burch, Superintendent Penitentiary, Dr.

For conveying S.J. Cardiff, an insane person, to the Asylum, Sept. 24, 1877

Mileage of Superintendent, 100 miles…………………………$ 10.00
Mileage of patient, 50 miles………………………………………$    5.00
Per diem of Superintendent, 1 day……………………………..$    3.00
Fare on railroad for Superintendent and patient…………..$    7.50
Hack Hire at Portland………………………………………………$    3.00
Meals for trip………………………………………………………….$    1.50
                                                                                                      Total:  $ 30.00

I hereby certify that the above account is correct.
 (signed)  B.F. Burch.

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The First Oregon State Hospital Replacement Project, 1883

16 09 2009
The Oregon State Hospital is in the midst of a rebirth. The Oregon State Hospital Replacement project is in full gear, working on revamping and replacing the well-worn J-building, which was itself part of a replacement project in 1883. The following is a transcription of an article appearing in the Morning Oregonian, October 24, 1883.

 

oregonian masthead cropped
The New Insane Asylum.

Full Description of the Home Prepared for the State’s Wards.

AN EDIFICE COMPLETE IN EVERY DETAIL.

History of the Structure and the Manner in Which it was Erected.

[Special Correspondence of the Oregonian.]

Salem, Oct. 23.

The completion of the new insane asylum building and its readiness for the reception of the patients brings the institution into prominence, and demands at the hands of THE OREGONIAN a complete description of the building.  With this object in view your correspondent has recently visited the building, and from the architect and others has recurred facts and figures of sufficient interest to merit publication. We have availed ourselves of the privilege accorded us of examining and culling from the public records, and have found them convenient while authentic.

ITS HISTORY

The legislative assembly of the state of Oregon for the year 1880 passed an act entitled “An act to provide for the construction of a brick insane asylum building, to levy a tax and appropriate money therefore;” which act was approved by the governor, October 25, 1880. By it was created a board of commissioners for its erection, which consisted of Hon. Z. F. Moody, governor, Hon. R. P. Earhart, secretary of state, and Hon. Edward Hirsch, state treasurer.  It evidently being the aim and intention of the legislative assembly to provide for the care by the state of the insane and idiotic patients immediately upon the expiration of the contract then existing between it and Dr. J.C. Hawthorne, as made by the governor under the provisions of an act approved October, 1878, which authorized and directed him to contract for the care and keeping of the insane and idiotic for six years from December 1, 1878, provided “that if, at the expiration of four years the state shall have provided a state insane asylum, then the contractor shall turn the patients under his charge over to the state,” the board lost no time in organizing, and entered upon its duties without unnecessary delay. W.F. Boothby, Esq., of Salem, was appointed supervising architect, and the board advertised for plans and specifications, a number of which were in due time prepared and presented for its consideration.  Being especially desirous when called upon to decide a question of such momentous importance to the public, to avail themselves of advice of persons of practical experience more particularly in relation it its sanitary requirements, the board called to its assistance several well known and experienced physicians from various parts of the state, including the late Dr. J.C. Hawthorne of East Portland, Dr. H. Carpenter of Portland, Dr. J.R. Bayley of Corvallis and Drs. S.R. Jessup and J.W. McAfee of Salem were present during the examination of the plans submitted, and whose suggestions were of great benefit to the board, evincing a desire on their part to allow no detail, however minute, to escape their attention that would in any degree ameliorate the condition of the unfortunate class for whose care and treatment the structure under advisement was to be erected.

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