Oregon Hospital for the Insane Description, 1868

5 09 2012

Listen to the 1868 report of visiting physician Dr. J.S. Giltner to the Oregon Hospital for the Insane in Portland. The Oregon Hospital for the Insane was a private hospital run by Drs. Hawthorne and Loreya in Portland, Oregon from 1861-1883. They contracted with the State of Oregon for the care of people diagnosed with insanity prior to the creation of the Oregon State Hospital in Salem.

We are experimenting with the idea of using a combination of QR codes and YouTube videos to create audio features in the exhibit spaces.  This is our first attempt.  Let us know what you think below.

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An Interview with Simeon Edward Josephi

6 06 2011

From the Oregon Health Sciences University's Archives

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The following is an interview with Dr. Simeon Edward Joesphi, physician (1877-1881) and superintendent (1881-1883) at the Oregon Hospital for the Insane and one time superintendent of the Oregon State Insane Asylum (1886-1887).[1]  The article appeared in two editions of Fred Lockley’s column, Impressions from a Journal Man, in the Oregon Journal starting September 1, 1926. The column regularly featured interviews with influential people in Oregon.

Impressions and Observations of the Journal Man

By Fred Lockley
9/1/1926

Here begins an installment story of the career of a pioneer physician of Portland, who came hither in 1867.  A second chapter is forthcoming.

Dr. S.E. Josephi is, in point of service, dean of the medical profession of Portland.  When I interviewed him recently at his office in the Corbett building, he said:

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“I was born in New York city on December 3, 1849.  My father, Edward Josephi[2], with his brothers Henry and Isaac, conducted a wholesale jewelry establishment in Maiden Lane.  My father was born at what was then St. Petersburg but is now Leningrad, Russia.  My mother’s maiden name was Sarah Mendoza.  Her parents were Spanish but she was born in England.  You can see that I am a product of the melting pot.  There eight of us children.  I had five sisters and two brothers.[3]  I went to school to Professor Quackenbos.  He had a private school in New York city at that time and was the author of an arithmetic that was very popular.  Later I attended the public schools of New York city and still later the Free Academy, now known as the New York college.  I secured work as a clerk in a wholesale hat house. Read the rest of this entry »





Oregon Hospital for the Insane, Portland 1861-1883

31 08 2010

The first institution in Oregon devoted to the care of the mentally ill was the Oregon Hospital for the Insane.  Drs. James C. Hawthorne and A.M. Loryea opened the private hospital in September of 1861 in a temporary building on Taylor Street between First and Second Avenues in Portland.  Somewhat ironically, the proprietors made it very clear that their hospital was only a temporary fix for the state’s mental health care needs, and stated at the dedication of the new institution that they would happily turn over their patients to the state in the event that it created an asylum to care for them.

In 1862, the hospital was moved to a new building off of Hawthorne Avenue, east of SE 12th Avenue.   The State of Oregon contracted with the hospital in the fall of that Read the rest of this entry »





The First Oregon State Hospital Replacement Project, 1883

16 09 2009
The Oregon State Hospital is in the midst of a rebirth. The Oregon State Hospital Replacement project is in full gear, working on revamping and replacing the well-worn J-building, which was itself part of a replacement project in 1883. The following is a transcription of an article appearing in the Morning Oregonian, October 24, 1883.

 

oregonian masthead cropped
The New Insane Asylum.

Full Description of the Home Prepared for the State’s Wards.

AN EDIFICE COMPLETE IN EVERY DETAIL.

History of the Structure and the Manner in Which it was Erected.

[Special Correspondence of the Oregonian.]

Salem, Oct. 23.

The completion of the new insane asylum building and its readiness for the reception of the patients brings the institution into prominence, and demands at the hands of THE OREGONIAN a complete description of the building.  With this object in view your correspondent has recently visited the building, and from the architect and others has recurred facts and figures of sufficient interest to merit publication. We have availed ourselves of the privilege accorded us of examining and culling from the public records, and have found them convenient while authentic.

ITS HISTORY

The legislative assembly of the state of Oregon for the year 1880 passed an act entitled “An act to provide for the construction of a brick insane asylum building, to levy a tax and appropriate money therefore;” which act was approved by the governor, October 25, 1880. By it was created a board of commissioners for its erection, which consisted of Hon. Z. F. Moody, governor, Hon. R. P. Earhart, secretary of state, and Hon. Edward Hirsch, state treasurer.  It evidently being the aim and intention of the legislative assembly to provide for the care by the state of the insane and idiotic patients immediately upon the expiration of the contract then existing between it and Dr. J.C. Hawthorne, as made by the governor under the provisions of an act approved October, 1878, which authorized and directed him to contract for the care and keeping of the insane and idiotic for six years from December 1, 1878, provided “that if, at the expiration of four years the state shall have provided a state insane asylum, then the contractor shall turn the patients under his charge over to the state,” the board lost no time in organizing, and entered upon its duties without unnecessary delay. W.F. Boothby, Esq., of Salem, was appointed supervising architect, and the board advertised for plans and specifications, a number of which were in due time prepared and presented for its consideration.  Being especially desirous when called upon to decide a question of such momentous importance to the public, to avail themselves of advice of persons of practical experience more particularly in relation it its sanitary requirements, the board called to its assistance several well known and experienced physicians from various parts of the state, including the late Dr. J.C. Hawthorne of East Portland, Dr. H. Carpenter of Portland, Dr. J.R. Bayley of Corvallis and Drs. S.R. Jessup and J.W. McAfee of Salem were present during the examination of the plans submitted, and whose suggestions were of great benefit to the board, evincing a desire on their part to allow no detail, however minute, to escape their attention that would in any degree ameliorate the condition of the unfortunate class for whose care and treatment the structure under advisement was to be erected.

      Read the rest of this entry »