A Visit to the Oregon State Hospital, 1916

5 08 2012

This is an excerpt from the Oregon Teacher’s Monthly magazine published in May 1916 (volume 20, no. 9).  Oregon Teacher’s Monthly featured articles written by teachers, students and administrators related to general interest topics and had a news section with a county by county listings of school-related events.  We came across this issue in the holdings of the Oregon State Library.  This excerpt is chapter 10 in a series of articles written by Frank K. Welles, Assistant State Superintendent of Public Instruction, on state institutions.  The information he presents appears to have come from studying published reports of the hospital and a personal tour.

 OUR OREGON STATE INSTITUTIONS

The Oregon State Hospital

 Some of the school children who will read this article have never visited a hospital for the insane and will be interested to know what such an institution looks like, how the hundreds of patients are cared for, what they do and how they live.  The modern hospital for the insane is quite a different institution from what it used to be.  Now it is indeed a hospital for the treatment of persons with deranged minds, most of whom also have some physical ailment, rather than simply an asylum for the detention and safe-keeping of the insane.

Oregon has two hospitals for the insane.  One is situated just east of the city limits of Salem and the other is a short distance west of Pendleton in Umatilla county.  The Eastern Oregon State Hospital was built during 1911 and 1912 and is modern in every respect.  As soon as this institution was completed, 325 patients were transferred to it from the Salem hospital in order to relieve the over-crowded condition at the latter place.  As far as possible, the insane from Eastern Oregon are sent to Pendleton and those from Western Oregon to Salem. The number of insane is increasing so rapidly that the last legislature authorized the construction of a new $100,000 wing to the Pendleton hospital.  This has recently been completed.  There is also a fine farm in connection with that institution.  The last report of the superintendent shows that there are now about 379 insane persons at the Pendleton hospital. Read the rest of this entry »

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Congratulations Mr. Mommsen!, 1958

2 11 2011

Dr. Dean K. Brooks, Governor Robert Holmes and Thomas Mommsen accepting award.  The Suggestor.  May 1958.The following is an article from the May 1958 edition of The Suggestor, a newsletter published by the Oregon State Employee Awards Board.

Congratulations, Mr. Mommsen!

After switching his attention from cutting meat to cutting costs, THOMAS N. MOMMSEN, meat cutter at the Oregon State Hospital in Salem, was presented a $400 award.  In the above picture Mommsen, on the right, is shown receiving his award from Governor ROBERT D. HOLMES as State Hospital Superintendent DEAN BROOKS looks on approvingly at the left.

Mommsen’s suggestion, which also won high praise from Gov. Holmes, involved processing and freezing of meat available from the hospital’s dairy herd and subtracting the amount from the hospital’s monthly contract for beef.  This will result in a reduction of 37,000 lbs. of meat that need to be purchased and will save the State and estimated $9,252 per year. Read the rest of this entry »





Asylum Report, 1897

15 12 2010

The following report was printed in the Salem-based  Capital Journal  newspaper April 6, 1897.  The author is particularly impressed by the productiveness of the Asylum Farms in the winter months.  Spelling is kept intact.

Asylum

Files Its Monthly Report

Remarkable Facts that Prove Possibilities of Our Climate

The monthly report of Supt. Paine of the Oregon State Insane Asylum is summarized below.  It shows one insane patient for each 350 to 360 population.  But differing from practice of eastern states, Oregon does not return the incurables to the counties they come from.  The persons properly to be classed as insane are probably not over one in 500 or 600, if the custom of other states prevailed.

The report of the steward of products of the garden and dairy, and the the the showing of farming operations for January, February and March is also remarkable, and real estate agents had better sucure a certified copy from the office of the secretary of state before sending it to states where anything is frozen up all winter. Read the rest of this entry »